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"Yin and Yang are the dao (way) of heaven and earth, the natural law of all things, the mother and father of change, the origin of life and death, and the house of spirit light. 
To treat disease, one must seek it's root."

The Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon: Volume 2 (~ 25th century BC)

 

What is Traditional Chinese Medicine?

What is Chinese Herbal Medicine?

What does Oriental Medicine treat?

Does  acupuncture hurt?

Would you speak to my club/group about Traditional Chinese Medicine?

 

 

What is Traditional Chinese Medicine?

Traditional Chinese Medicine is a wholistic and comprehensive system of health-care practiced for over 3000 years.  It is based on the philosophy of the inter-relationship between living things and nature.  Within this concept, the human being is a microcosm of nature sharing the same vital source (Qi) in which all life forms and their bio-processes are animated and sustained.  It is a study of the energetic functions of the body in which it is viewed as a “landscape”.  In this human landscape, a network of pathways or channels exists to direct the flow of Qi and Xue (blood) throughout the whole body to promote optimal health & homeostasis.

When blockages arise in the channels due to lifestyle indiscretions, emotional injuries and physical traumas, pain and disease will ensue.  This blockage can hinder the distribution of the nourishment that the body requires to function optimally.  The restoration of the un-inhibited flow of Qi and blood is achieved through the practice of Acupuncture, Chinese Herbal medicine, tui-na (therapeutic massage) and life-style changes.  In doing so, the body’s inherent qualities to regain health and equilibrium is supported and thus restored.  When Qi and blood flow freely throughout the body, one enjoys good physical, mental and emotional well-being. [top]

 

What is Chinese Herbal Medicine?

Chinese Herbal Medicine (CHM) is a system of herbology originating over four thousand years ago. A Chinese medical text dated to 168 B.C. entitled Prescriptions for fifty two ailments, named over 250 medicinal substances. However, the foundation for today’s Chinese Materia Medica is the Divine Husbandman’s Herbal Foundation Canon. This book’s authorship is unknown and was compiled mostly in the Eastern Han dynasty (25 – 220 AD). It contains 365 substances; 252 botanical substances, 67 animal substances, and 46 mineral substances. Evolving over the years, Chinese medicine has named and categorized over 6000 medicinal substances.

CHM categorizes substances by their flavor: bitter, sweet, acrid/pungent, salty, and sour/astringent; nature: hot, warm, neutral, cool, and cold; functions based on the 8 methods: sweating, ejection, precipitation, harmonizing, warming, clearing, supplementation, and dispersion; and the specific organ system(s) and channel(s) entered/affected. Differing from the western allopathic system of treatment antagonistic to the main symptom, CHM treats the whole person taking into account the lifestyle, emotions, behaviors, diet, environment, and weather experienced by the patient. The following Chinese medical statement expresses the fundamental principle of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and CHM:

An herbal prescription is formulated based on an individual’s current existing pattern(s). This pattern(s) of disharmony is identified based upon the chief complaint and all associated symptoms and signs.  Typically, an herbal formula consists of 2 or more substances combined to correct a pattern of disharmony.  The formula is composed in hierarchy form by classifying the substances as sovereign, minister, assistant, or courier.  The sovereign medicinal substance performs the main function of the formula.  The minister aids the sovereign in treating the main pattern or causing an effect on a coexisting pattern.  The assistant herbs reinforce the functions of the sovereign and minister, as well as moderating the harsh properties of these herbs.  The courier serves as a guide to focus the actions of the formula on a specific organ system, channel, or area of the body or to harmonize all the ingredients in the formula.  Side effects are rare except for an occasional unpleasant taste.  In many cases, the patient will experience a need for the taste and appreciate its medicinal value.  CHM is a complete system treating all internal disease, musculo-skeletal disorders, and mental disorders whether they are acute or chronic/long term. [top]

What does Oriental Medicine treat?

The 3,000 year old art of Acupuncture is one of the oldest and most widely used forms of traditional medicine in the world. On November 5, 1997, the National Institute of Health (NIH) issued a panel consensus statement on Acupuncture. The conclusion was as follows: There is clear evidence that needle acupuncture treatments are effective for postoperative and chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting, nausea of pregnancy, and postoperative dental pain. The panel also concluded that there are a number of other pain-related conditions for which acupuncture may be effective as an adjunct therapy, an acceptable alternative, or as a part of a comprehensive treatment program. These conditions include but are not limited to addiction, stroke rehabilitation, headache, menstrual cramps, tennis elbow, fibromyalgia (general muscle pain), low back pain, carpal tunnel syndrome, and asthma.
Treatable Conditions Approved by The World Health Organization:
Sinusitis, Rhinitis, Common Cold, Tonsillitis, Bronchitis, Bronchial Asthma, Acute Conjunctivitis, Cataract, Myopia, Central Retinitis, Toothache, Pain after Tooth Extraction, Gingivitis, Pharyngitis, Periarthritis, Humeroscapularis, Tennis Elbow, Sciatica, Low Back Pain, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Esophagus & Cardia Spasms, Hiccups, Gastroptosis, Gastritis, Gastric Hyperacidity, Chronic Pain, Duodenal Ulcer, Colitis, Bacterial Dysentery, Paralytic Ileus, Constipation, Diarrhea, Headache, Migraine, Trigeminal Neuralgia, Facial Paralysis, Paralysis, Paralysis after Apoplectic Fit, Peripheral Neuropathy, Paralysis caused by Poliomyelitis, Meniere’s syndrome, Neurogenic Bladder, Dysfunction, Nocturnal Enuresis, Intercostal Neuralgia. [top]

Does  acupuncture hurt?

Acupuncture is not a painful process; very fine, thin, solid, stainless steel, gold, silver, copper or zinc needles are inserted at specific acupuncture points.  These points are not located on nerve pathways or in blood vessels, so very little sensation is felt upon insertion.  After the needle has been inserted, patients often report feelings of heaviness, tingling, mild numbness, or a sense of movement along the channels in the area.  These sensations are perfectly normal, and are not considered painful in any way.  If you still have concerns please speak to us about the process, we will be more than willing to help alleviate your fears or concerns. [top]

Would you speak to my club/group about Traditional Chinese Medicine?

We will gladly speak to your clubs or groups about the benefits of Traditional Chinese Medicine. With growing interest in the vast field of Wholistic medicine, there can be much confusion as to which direction one should pursue in their healthcare.  Our goal is to facilitate proper resources in TCM so that you can be an active participant in your own health and healing.  Thank you for helping us spread the word about the benefits of this medicine. [top]




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